Introducing Cascade’s most powerful dishwasher detergent ever!

I was at Cascade’s website trying to figure out the difference between Cascade Platinum and Cascade Complete and didn’t see the “Of Clorox” in the list under “Cascade With The Power” and I would totally buy Cascade With The Power instead of Cascade Platinum or Cascade Complete.

Cascade With The Power

Let’s make this happen, people!

Merry Holidays and Happy Christmas, y’all!

Collier’s magazine — December 13, 1952

Image: Scan of one of my latest vintage mag acquisitions. Cover illustration by C. William Randall.

Claus for Alarm

1949 “Travel Refreshed” Coca-Cola / Coke Santa Claus / Sprite Boy Ad

I have several questions.

Does Coke taste even better if you tilt the bottle up that high as you’re drinking it?

Did Santa pound that bottle cap into the Coca-Cola’s Sprite Boy’s forehead?

Does it mind control, lobotomize or zombify poor Sprite Boy?

Was Sprite Boy a naughty boy and this is his punishment?

If sprites are tiny, just how tiny are those tiny reindeer?

Seriously, that bottle cap looks like it hurts. Just look at his eyes.

Trivia: Coca-Cola didn’t introduce Sprite until 1961, which makes Sprite Boy pre-Sprite.

I’m sure it all made sense at the time.

Santa Claus was born in a barn, apparently.

1947 Coca-Cola / Coke Santa Claus Christmas Ad

Close that damned fridge door, Santa! We’re not made of money! Continue reading

Christmas at Bernie’s

1944 Coca-Cola / Coke Christmas ad

I wonder how long it took them to realize that the father in this 1944 Coca-Cola Christmas ad was dead?

He’s pining.

Continue reading

Shirking Boredom with Airplane Safety Instruction Cards

floating

On the last leg of my flight from Seattle to Bismarck, I went looking for a diversion.

This is what happened. Continue reading

Ten Least Popular Flavors of Jell-O

Parsnip Delight

Bologna

Viking Longship

Pigeon Squeezings

Green

Burning Tire

Musk

February Jack-o’-Lantern

Touch of Bleach

Gladys

Strike a pose.

Vogue magazine, April 1, 1950, and it’s mine!

Sometimes the cover of vintage magazine catches my eye more than others and I end up digging around to learn more about it. This was one of those times, especially since this particular Vogue magazine from April 1, 1950, wasn’t listed in the lot I won on eBay and received a few weeks ago. I’m not complaining, as another copy of this issue recently sold on eBay for $249.

The cover photo of “Queen of Fashion Inc.” Jean Patchett is by Irving Penn and was the first black and white Vogue cover since they started using color in 1909. The black lipstick Patchett wore was MacGyver’d from mascara to maximize the contrast. Penn was rather prolific and prodigious for Vogue, shooting 165 covers between 1943 and 2009.

Additional trivia: A 17”x15” signed print of this Irving Penn photograph sold for $481,000 at a 2008 Christie’s auction.

Damn, I have good and expensive taste!

Would you like to know more?

In Vogue: From Penn to Leibovitz, Seven New Exhibitions Spotlight Our Photographers and Their Work

As “Irving Penn: The Centennial” Opens at the Met, We Consider the Photographer’s Vogue Career

Christie’s — Photographs — 11 April 2008, New York — Lot 343

Jean was “a young American Goddess of Paris Couture”.

Inceptional!

Whisper the Wonder Puss achieves the legendary Cat in a Box in a Box in a Box in a Box position.

So many boxes, so little time.

Smoking is for Squares!

Hey, kitten. There’s a lot going on in this 1964 comic book anti-smoking PSA by DC Comics.

Smoking is for Squares! 1964 DC Comic Book PSA from an issue of Tales of the Unexpected

I’m still not quite sure why Paulette Breen suddenly turns into a 53-year-old truck stop waitress in the fifth panel. Probably from all the pointing. Continue reading