Tag Archives: magazines

I need to subscribe to This Meeting Could’ve Been an Email magazine.

Successful Meetings and Meetings Today magazines

Anyway, here’s Wonderwall.

Cover of the March 1923 issue of Modern Priscilla magazine
Modern Priscilla magazine cover, March 1923

The Bootlegger

Cover of the December 4, 1919 issue of Life magazine

Cover of the December 4, 1919 issue of Life magazine

Not to be confused with bootlicker.

A little bit and another little bit about artist Paul Stahr.

History not-so-fun fact:
This issue is dated December 4, 1919.
Prohibition began in the United States on January 17, 1920.

It’s got a cat on it.

Cover for The Countryside Magazine and Suburban Life, April 1917 - art by Paul Bransom
Cover for The Countryside Magazine and Suburban Life, April 1917 – art by Paul Bransom

Along with ads of yore, I also love a good magazine cover.

From my collection, here’s The Countryside Magazine and Suburban Life’s cover for April 1917 (Spring Planting Number) with art by Paul Bransom.

The New York Times has a rather fine obituary/biography of the “Dean of American Animal Artists” here.

Insidious Diseases and Hidden Decay

Would you trust your tree with this man?

“I will go out on a limb for your tree.” — John Davey, probably
Ad for Davey Tree Surgeons found in the April 1917 issue of Countryside / Suburban Life magazine.
Ad for Davey Tree Surgeons found in the April 1917 issue of Countryside / Suburban Life magazine.

Bone shards:

I didn’t realize that tree surgeons were a thing until I read a bit about the profession in a Straight Dope column about Groucho Marx by Cecil Adams. Yes, you should read the entire column.

Way back in the day, Groucho Marx hosted a radio/TV quiz show called “You Bet Your Life. During one show when he was interviewing a tree surgeon, he asked, “Have you ever fallen out of any of your patients?”

Read one heck of an obituary for Groucho here.

And now you know about tree surgeons too.

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A peacock “has angels’ feathers, a devil’s voice, and the walk of a thief.”

It’s been quite a week, so here’s the cover of my copy of January 1934’s Country Life magazine. The masthead has some design issues but the artwork is sublime.

Oh say can you yeeeeeeee-hawwwwww!

The Country Gentleman magazine for July 1926. Cover art by N.C. Wyeth.
The Country Gentleman magazine for July 1926. Cover art by N.C. Wyeth.

In honor of Independence Day, here’s one of my favorite magazine covers in my collection — The July 1926 issue of The Country Gentleman with cover art by American artist (painter/illustrator/muralist) N.C. Wyeth. It was also one of the more elusive magazines for me to track down, but totally worth it.

It’s nice to see Wyeth’s biography is a lot more complete and accessible online than many other illustrators of the era, but sad to find his life ended by a freight train.

Also, it’s no surprise that horses really aren’t very fond of fireworks. Be kind, y’all.

The Little Girl is Right

Magazine ad for Hart Schaffner & Marx - late 40s/early 50s
Guess who forgot to write the month/year/mag again? Umm… I was originally thinking probably late-40s, maybe early-50s. But she appears to be using some sort of Dictaphone or Ediphone, which would place it in the 1920s or earlier. Unless their boss never upgraded the office equipment, which is also entirely plausible. The shirt collar and necktie kind of have that Roaring Twenties look though. I’m talking to myself again, aren’t I. Yes, Clay, you are.

This ad must’ve taken place before they invented personal zones.

A bit about the artist Jay Hyde Barnum.

Hey! The company is still around!

A guide to wearing wool in the summer.

And speaking of wool, meet Shrek, the sheep who escaped shearing for six years by hiding in New Zealand caves.

Or perhaps you would prefer a wood suit?

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Bring Yourself to Budget

Full page Budget Tapes & Records ad from the July 8, 1971 issue of Rolling Stone magazine
Full page Budget Tapes & Records ad from the July 8, 1971 issue of Rolling Stone magazine

During my back half of high school and first year of college in the late-80s, I worked at a strip-mall store called Budget Tapes and Records in Bismarck and Fargo, North Dakota. It didn’t pay much, but was definitely one of the coolest jobs around. When I started, CDs were still sold in “long boxes” and beta videos and vinyl were on the way out. And yes, we also sold tobacco accessories for use with tobacco and only tobacco. Tobacco.

The Budget Tapes & Records logo from my era.
The Budget Tapes & Records logo from my era.

So imagine my surprise when I was flipping through an old Rolling Stone magazine and found a full page ad for an earlier version of Budget Tapes and Records. Full page. Rolling Stone magazine. Daaaaaaamn. Also, it appears they were way cooler back then.

Note: Even though the Eighties-era Bismarck and Fargo stores weren’t as cool as the 1971 stores, they were still much cooler than the Williston, North Dakota store. Yeesh.

Another note: Hey! My old boss (and his brother) made it into Billboard magazine back in the day!

Whew. Lots of memories coming back from this gig, few of which I’d share here. Thanks for coming along for the ride.

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This is Sean. Don’t cramp Sean’s style.

1974 magazine ad for Midol.
1974 magazine ad for Midol. 

Fun facts: Midol was originally advertised as a headache, neuralgia and toothache remedy, then later as a cure for hiccups. After that, it headed south.

An anti-spasmodic (antispasmodic these days) drug suppress muscle spasms. Hello, IBS!

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